BBA Communities

Black Oak Mine USD, CA


Black Oak Mine USD, CA

Georgetown Divide Ready by 21 Coalition

Then In 2005, Black Oak Mine Unified School District leaders found high rates of teen drug and alcohol abuse. Student attendance was high, but evidence indicated that high school students were “dropping out in place.”

Now The community is trained and organized to provide supports and opportunities for students, including intensive classroom-based youth development strategies, opportunities for student leadership, and outreach to the 0-5 population.

Learn more about Georgetown Divide Ready by 21 Coalition

Tangelo Park, FL


Tangelo Park, FL

Tangelo Park Program

Then “17 years ago, Tangelo Park was one of the most crime-ridden neighborhoods in Orlando. Some people referred to it as the ‘wild, wild west,’ with drug dealers ruling the streets.”

Now There has been a 50% reduction in crime from 1993, when the program began, to 2009.

Learn more about Tangelo Park Program

Boston, MA


Boston, MA

City Connects

Then There was no systematic way to connect urban schoolchildren with the rich resources of the city’s
community partners, or for schools to efficiently address the out-of-school factors impacting students.

Now Student support in school has been revitalized, ensuring that a uniquely tailored plan of enrichment and supports is designed to meet each student’s individual strengths and needs.

Learn more about City Connects

Douglas and Sarpy County, NE


Douglas and Sarpy County, NE

Building Bright Futures

Then 18,000 young children in Douglas and Sarpy Counties live in low-income families, 42% of children lack a regular health care provider, and more than 5,000 students are absent from school in the greater Omaha area on a given day.

Now Community collaboration and new partnerships address early childhood, health, academic support and engagement needs, reaching out to students in Douglas and Sarpy Counties who are not ready to enter kindergarten or are at high risk of school failure or drop-out,  

Learn more about Building Bright Futures

Newark, NJ


Newark, NJ

Newark Global Village School Zone

Then No coherent strategy for addressing student social needs, quality control in academic or social programs, or community voice in decision-making.

Now Active parent councils operating at all seven NGVZ schools, afterschool programs created based on a community needs assessment, new academic plan adopted at each school, based on assessment of student learning needs, and professional development tailored to meet teacher needs.

Learn more about Newark Global Village School Zone

Harlem, NY


Harlem, NY

Harlem Children's Zone

Then Through the 1980s and 1990s, the crack epidemic tore through Harlem; open-air drug markets flourished while families disintegrated.

Now Over 10,000 children in the 97 block Children’s Zone® are supported by programs at every developmental age group designed to help every child prepare for and graduate from college.

Learn more about Harlem Children's Zone

New York, NY


New York, NY

Children's Aid Society Community Schools

Then  Schools were isolated from the community, and unmet student needs were overwhelming teachers and other school staff.

Now  School curriculum is integrated with out-of-school time programming and with support services for students and their families. Teacher attendance and satisfaction, student success, and parent engagement all improved.
 

Learn more about Children's Aid Society Community Schools

Syracuse, NY


Syracuse, NY

Say Yes to Education

Then Limited access to after-school programs, tutoring, and summer enrichment, 1 social worker for every 550 students, enrollment in Syracuse City School District declining.

Now District-wide access to quality after-school academic and enrichment and summer camps, structured tutoring and mentoring programs, 1 social worker for every 200 students, SCSD enrollment increased for the first time in a decade.

Learn more about Say Yes to Education

Cincinnati, OH


Cincinnati, OH

Community Learning Centers (CLCS)

Then Enrollment declined from 90,000 in 1970 to 45,000 in 1999, while the student body went from 70% middle class and above to 70% poverty during that time. By 2001, the graduation rate was just 52%.

Now Enrollment declines have been reversed, with nearly 6,000 more students than projected.

Learn more about Community Learning Centers (CLCS)

Multnomah County, OR


Multnomah County, OR

Schools Uniting Neighborhoods (SUN) Community Schools

Then In 1999, eight SUN schools in two districts served a total of 1,750 children.

Now Ten years later, in 2009, 58 SUN schools in six districts were serving 19,000 children and adults, with nearly 100,000 people served through family and community social service and educational events.

Learn more about Schools Uniting Neighborhoods (SUN) Community Schools

Humble, TX


Humble, TX

Quest Early College High School

Then  Schools in a rapidly growing suburb north of Houston faced discipline challenges due to increasing student disengagement.

Now  “Our purpose, in partnership with families and community, is to develop each child intellectually, artistically, emotionally, physically, and socially so that all students are life-long learners, complex thinkers, responsible global citizens and effective communicators, and is reflected in policies and practices throughout the district.”
 

Learn more about Quest Early College High School

South Kitsap, WA


South Kitsap, WA

South Kitsap School District (SKSD)

Then  Rising rates of free and reduced lunches; decreasing enrollment; stagnant achievement and unsustained academic gains; inconsistent and unstable levels of community trust and of student success from one building to another

Then  The district’s belief that every child is capable of success and that the entire community must be engaged to support its students is reflected in its Declaration of Interdependence.
 

Learn more about South Kitsap School District (SKSD)

Vancouver, WA


Vancouver, WA

Family-Community Resource Centers

Then Three percent of high school students were enrolled in pre-Advanced Placement, AP, pre-International Baccalaureate, and IB programs. One elementary school offered an early learning program for preschool children.

Now Forty-five percent of high school students are enrolled in pre-AP and pre-IB programs, AP and IB exam pass rates are 10 percent over national average. Twelve elementary schools offer early learning programs for preschool-aged children. 

Learn more about Family-Community Resource Centers


Broader, BOLDER Approach to Education

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